The Daily Puppy

Friday, November 23, 2012

handyman rules in california


Does a handyman need a license to work in California?

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Best Answer
Yes, if he/she wants to do any work that totals more that $500 in materials and labor. No handyman license is available in California so most handymen get their General Contractors license. To legally work without a license persons working as handymen in California are relying on the Minor Work Exemption:
California Business And Professions Code BPC Section 7048
This chapter does not apply to any work or operation on one
undertaking or project by one or more contracts, the aggregate
contract price which for labor, materials, and all other items, is
less than five hundred dollars ($500), that work or operations being
considered of casual, minor, or inconsequential nature.
This exemption does not apply in any case wherein the work of
construction is only a part of a larger or major operation, whether
undertaken by the same or a different contractor, or in which a
division of the operation is made in contracts of amounts less than
five hundred dollars ($500) for the purpose of evasion of this
chapter or otherwise.
This exemption does not apply to a person who advertises or puts
out any sign or card or other device which might indicate to the
public that he or she is a contractor or that he or she is qualified
to engage in the business of a contractor.
Yes, if he/she wants to do any work that totals more that $500 in materials and labor. No handyman license is available in California so most handymen get their General Contractors license. To legally work without a license persons working as handymen in California are relying on the Minor Work Exemption:
California Business And Professions Code BPC Section 7048
This chapter does not apply to any work or operation on one
undertaking or project by one or more contracts, the aggregate
contract price which for labor, materials, and all other items, is
less than five hundred dollars ($500), that work or operations being
considered of casual, minor, or inconsequential nature.
This exemption does not apply in any case wherein the work of
construction is only a part of a larger or major operation, whether
undertaken by the same or a different contractor, or in which a
division of the operation is made in contracts of amounts less than
five hundred dollars ($500) for the purpose of evasion of this
chapter or otherwise.
This exemption does not apply to a person who advertises or puts
out any sign or card or other device which might indicate to the
public that he or she is a contractor or that he or she is qualified
to engage in the business of a contractor.

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